Poster: War in the Neighborhood

This poster, attached below, is made to be printed on 11x17 paper and posted around town everywhere.


"On April 8th, residents at Edgewood Courts apartments confronted dozens of Atlanta police officers who were attacking a crowd of people. What made this event remarkable was not the repression -- beatings and arrests are standard police behavior -- but that people fought back.

The specific events are not clear to us, but we understand this struggle as another moment of the endless conflict between populations and the police designed to control them: Oakland 2010, Seattle 2011, Anaheim 2012, and East Flatbush, Brooklyn a few weeks ago. All over the country, neighborhoods have organized to resist their common enemy: the cops.

The recent repression in Edgewood Courts, however, must be seen in its unique context. The City of Atlanta has begun a process of "revitalization" and redevelopment of large parts of the city. But for whom?

Developers, capitalists, businessmen, and tourists. Their goal is not to eradicate drugs or crime from the area, but to annihilate the people who stand in their way, the forces that are obstacles to the growth of profit and the escalation of control.


This was not the first time the people living in Edgewood Courts fought the police and we do not expect it to be the last. A week ago, youth congregating at the Edgewood playground were instructed to disperse by the police and refused to follow orders. Rumor has it that someone threw a brick at a cop who drew his shotgun on the crowd of kids.


We are excited by these events and inspired by the courage of the neighborhood. We know that the first step is always the hardest, but we hope to see uncontrollable situations continue to emerge from the self-organized struggle against the police.

What will it take to get the police out of this neighborhood for good?"

AttachmentSize
edgewoodaprilposter.cleaned.jpg1.19 MB

Comments

Re: Poster: War in the Neighborhood

#youcouldagreemore #throwmorebricks #bricksformediavanstoo

Re: Poster: War in the Neighborhood

lol @ bricksfornewsvanstoo

I couldn't agree more...

Re: Poster: War in the Neighborhood

#hashtag

Re: Poster: War in the Neighborhood

#hashtageverything

Re: Poster: War in the Neighborhood

#assaultthemedia

#bricksfornewsvanstoo

Re: Poster: War in the Neighborhood

I usually don't trust media outlets,

 

But when I do, I trust them with responsibly handling information about covert anti-police action.

 

Thanks 11alive.

Re: Poster: War in the Neighborhood

I am a reporter with 11Alive trying to talk with those helping to organize the community's effort to expose issues with police.  Can anyone give me contact info for the person/people behind these posters?  Thanks!  404-545-9379.

Re: Poster: War in the Neighborhood

internet discourse catalogues. displays. webthings are born a click away from being memed, gif'd, troll'd, basically reduced to a passing laugh, or a momentary eyebrow raise.

 

why call it a riot? why not an uprising, or a rebellion? how do the ppl and the children central to the situation understand it?

 

btw, big ups to copwatch. stay unjailed.

 

Re: Poster: War in the Neighborhood

So happy. Just. So. Happy. 

Re: Poster: War in the Neighborhood

"each re-mark re-situates, each re-situation fixes. attaching dormant words to the emergent piles upon what had opened the weight of inherently limiting discourse (and maybe internet discourse is the densest/ most stifling of all)."

 

Thnx Derrida. What are some "emergent" words we can use? Why is internet discourse the most dense and stifling?

Re: Poster: War in the Neighborhood

Riot today in Edgewood.

Several dozen kids masked and unmasked threw bricks, bottles, rocks, etc. at police. They pushed the cops away at least 3 times.

After cops began to pour into the neighborhood, the large crowd rushed back into the neighborhood and mostly escaped the police. I am not sure if there were any arrests.

Check back for more updates later!

 

Re: Poster: War in the Neighborhood

just a thought (i really don't know):

could your immediate re-marking on what occurred yesterday be the work of Empire emerging in the desire to describe (which always is already a circumscription)?

each re-mark re-situates, each re-situation fixes. attaching dormant words to the emergent piles upon what had opened the weight of inherently limiting discourse (and maybe internet discourse is the densest/ most stifling of all).


could remarking on something, something not necessarily new, but something that in some new way opened itself to the world yesterday, especially naming it ('war in the neighborhood'), already be the beginnings of the first steps towards (its) closure?

if we write what it is, especially quickly, externally, how much of our own attitudes interject themselves into its process of unfolding? are there other means of grasping for the same ends? can 'it' ever be talked about without bending it and stretching it to fits our personal representations, or the models we use to make sense of the world?


these words are offered from friend-to-friend, with similar desires for the dismemberment of managerial activity wherever it exists.